Building an aws lambda serverless architecture application with Node.js and c# example codes

What is aws lambda & serverless architecture?

AWS Lambda is a serverless computing service offered by Amazon Web Services (AWS). It allows users to run code without provisioning or managing servers.

Instead, users upload their code to AWS Lambda and it automatically scales and manages the infrastructure required to run the code.

Serverless architecture, also known as function-as-a-service (FaaS), is a cloud computing model where the cloud provider manages the infrastructure and users only pay for the actual usage of their application.

This means that users do not need to worry about managing servers, operating systems, or any other infrastructure.

They simply focus on writing the code for their application and the cloud provider takes care of the rest.

AWS Lambda is one of the most popular implementations of serverless architecture.

It allows users to create functions in a variety of programming languages, such as Python, Node.js, Java, and C#.

These functions can be triggered by events, such as changes to a database or a file being uploaded to an S3 bucket, and they can be used to build a wide range of applications,

from simple data processing scripts to complex web applications.

AWS lambda serverless architecture example code application written in Node.js

Here is an example of a simple AWS Lambda function written in Node.js that can be used in a serverless architecture:

exports.handler = async (event) => {
    const name = event.name || 'World';
    return {
        statusCode: 200,
        body: `Hello, ${name}!`
    };
};

This function is triggered by an event and returns a message that includes the name passed in the event, or “World” if no name is provided.

The handler function is exported as the entry point for the Lambda function.

To use this function in a serverless architecture, you would typically create a serverless.yml file that defines the function and any necessary resources, such as an API Gateway endpoint.

Here is an example of a serverless.yml file that uses the above function:

service: my-service

provider:
  name: aws
  runtime: nodejs14.x

functions:
  hello:
    handler: index.handler
    events:
      - http:
          path: hello
          method: get

This serverless.yml file defines a service called “my-service” and specifies that it should run on the AWS platform with the Node.js 14.x runtime.

It also defines a function called “hello” that uses the handler function from the previous example.

Finally, it defines an API Gateway endpoint that maps the HTTP GET method to the “hello” function,

which means that when a user visits the “/hello” path on this API Gateway endpoint, the Lambda function will be triggered and return the “Hello, World!” message.

AWS lambda serverless architecture building small application example code in C#

Here is an example of a simple AWS Lambda function written in C#:

using Amazon.Lambda.Core;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

[assembly: LambdaSerializer(typeof(Amazon.Lambda.Serialization.SystemTextJson.DefaultLambdaJsonSerializer))]

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public class MyLambdaFunction
    {
        public async Task<string> FunctionHandler(IDictionary<string, object> input, ILambdaContext context)
        {
            string name = (string)input.GetValueOrDefault("name", "World");
            string message = $"Hello, {name}!";
            return message;
        }
    }
}

This function takes a dictionary as input and returns a string message that includes the name passed in the input dictionary or “World” if no name is provided.

To use this function in a serverless architecture with AWS Lambda, you would create an AWS Lambda function and upload the compiled C# code as a .NET Core 3.1 or later runtime package.

You can use the AWS Management Console, the AWS CLI, or an AWS SDK to deploy your function.

Here’s an example of using the AWS CLI to deploy the above function:

  1. Compile the C# code into a .NET Core 3.1 or later runtime package:
dotnet publish -c Release --self-contained -r linux-x64

2. Create an AWS Lambda function with the .NET Core 3.1 runtime:

aws lambda create-function --function-name MyLambdaFunction --runtime dotnetcore3.1 --handler MyNamespace::MyLambdaFunction::FunctionHandler --zip-file fileb://./bin/Release/netcoreapp3.1/linux-x64/publish.zip

3. Invoke the AWS Lambda function:

aws lambda invoke --function-name MyLambdaFunction --payload '{"name": "John"}' response.txt

This command will invoke the function with the input dictionary {"name": "John"} and write the response to a file named response.txt.


AWS lambda serverless architecture example python code application

here’s an example of a simple AWS Lambda function written in Python that can be used in a serverless architecture:

import json

def lambda_handler(event, context):
    name = event.get('name', 'World')
    message = f'Hello, {name}!'
    response = {
        'statusCode': 200,
        'body': json.dumps(message)
    }
    return response

This function is similar to the Node.js example I provided earlier.

It takes an event as input, which is a dictionary that may contain a “name” key. If the “name” key is present, it includes it in the message.

If not, it uses “World” as the default name. Finally, it returns a dictionary that includes the HTTP status code and the message as a JSON-encoded string.

To use this function in a serverless architecture, you would create a serverless.

yml file that defines the function and any necessary resources, such as an API Gateway endpoint. Here is an example of a serverless.

yml file that uses the above function:

service: my-service

provider:
  name: aws
  runtime: python3.9

functions:
  hello:
    handler: handler.lambda_handler
    events:
      - http:
          path: hello
          method: get

This serverless.yml file defines a service called “my-service” and specifies that it should run on the AWS platform with the Python 3.9 runtime.

It also defines a function called “hello” that uses the lambda_handler function from the previous example.

Finally, it defines an API Gateway endpoint that maps the HTTP GET method to the “hello” function, which means that when a user visits the “/hello” path on this API Gateway endpoint, the Lambda function will be triggered and return the “Hello, World!” message.


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